Tag Archives: christmas veg

12 veg of Christmas – 5 swede recipes

swede-fieldGuy says
We sow our swedes around Midsummer’s Day on our more exposed fields that rise towards Dartmoor, giving slower growth and more flavour. By Christmas a good frost should have hit, which adds to the flavour; a little hardship always does.

swede, celeriac & carrots braised in olive oil

serves 4-6 as a side
This is a Turkish method, common along the Aegean coast, that’s used for cooking lots of different vegetables. The idea is to braise them slowly with lemon juice, olive oil, salt and a little sugar to concentrate and accentuate their natural flavours. It is definitely best served at room temperature, and preferably the next day. This recipe comes from Riverford Cook Anna, who likes it served as part of a mezze spread.

swede-celeriac-carrots½ large swede (about 500g)
½ large celeriac (about 500g)
2 large carrots (about 250g)
juice of 2 lemons, or to taste
125ml good olive oil
2 tsp sugar, or to taste
1½ tsp salt, or to taste
1 fresh bay leaf
4 peppercorns
leaves and tender stems from a bunch of parsley (about 30g), chopped
leaves and tender stems from a bunch of dill (about 30g), chopped

Scrub and peel the vegetables. Cut the carrots into thickish slices on a sharp angle. Cut the swede and celeriac into 1cm slices, and then into 1cm batons. Cut these into cubes or diamonds. Put the veg into a large, wide pan and add the lemon juice, olive oil, sugar, salt, bay leaf and peppercorns. Add cold water until they are almost but not quite submerged. Cover with baking paper pressed to the surface and a lid and set over a medium heat. When it comes to a simmer, turn the heat down and cook slowly for about 1 hour, until the vegetables are completely tender. Try to avoid stirring too much so that the vegetables hold their shape. Halfway through the cooking time, taste the braising liquid and decide if it needs more lemon, oil or seasonings. When the vegetables are done, lift them out with a slotted spoon into your serving dish and discard the bay leaf and peppercorns. With the pan uncovered, boil the braising liquid until reduced and syrupy. Taste it occasionally and stop it from boiling if it’s becoming too salty. Add the herbs to the liquid, then pour it over the vegetables and let cool. Serve at room temperature.

swede, leek & bacon gratin

serves 6-8
The leeks in this gratin could easily be replaced with boiled greens such as cabbage or kale. Leave out the bacon and it makes a flavoursome vegetarian main course.

100ml milk
500ml double cream
2 garlic cloves
1 large rosemary or thyme sprig
150g smoked streaky bacon, cut into lardons
1–2 tbsp olive oil
3 leeks, white and pale green parts cut in rings
knob of butter (about 30g), plus extra to grease the gratin dish
1 swede, peeled and sliced paper thin (use a mandolin if you have one)
salt and black pepper

Heat the oven to 170°C/Gas 3. Put the milk, cream, garlic and rosemary or thyme in a pan over a low–medium heat. Slowly bring to a boil and then gently simmer for 5 minutes, being careful not to let it boil over. Season with salt and pepper and remove from the heat. Fry the bacon in the oil in a frying pan over a medium heat until really crispy. Add the leeks and a knob of butter and cook on a low heat for 20–30 minutes, until the leeks are soft and justswede-field4 beginning to caramelise. Season well with salt and pepper. Arrange half the sliced swede on the bottom of a greased gratin or shallow ovenproof dish and season. Add the sautéed leeks and then top with the remaining swede and season again. Press the layers down with the back of a spoon. Using a sieve, strain over the infused milk and cream mixture and cover the dish with foil. Bake in the oven for about 1 hour, until a blunt knife can be easily inserted through to the bottom. Uncover and bake for 15 minutes until the gratin is golden around the edges. Leave to stand for 10 minutes before serving.

Variation
Top the gratin with a hard grating cheese such as Parmesan, Cheddar, pecorino or Gruyère and return to the oven for the last 10 minutes.

swede, leek & apple bake

serves 4, prep 10 mins, cook 75 mins

swede-leek-apple-bake25g butter, plus extra for greasing
2 leeks, finely shredded
4 large (or more smaller) sage leaves
75ml white wine or apple juice
1 swede (800g-1kg unpeeled weight), peeled, cut in half lengthways, then very finely sliced
2 apples, cored, halved & thinly sliced
50g cheddar, grated

Preheat your oven to 180˚C. Melt the butter in a large frying pan and fry the leeks on a very low heat for 12 mins, stirring now and then. Add the sage and wine or juice. Cook for 2 mins. Season with salt and pepper. Layer the swede, apple and leeks in a baking dish, finishing with swede. Cover with foil and bake for 45 mins. Remove the foil, sprinkle with cheese and bake for 15 mins until golden.

roasted swede with maple syrup

Serve this with cooked gammon ham or ham hock, thick slices of bacon, or with roast meats.

1 swede, peeled & cut into roast potato sized chunks
3 tbsp maple syrup
2 tbsp olive oil

Preheat the oven to 200˚C/Gas Mark 6. Heat a couple of tablespoons of oil in a flameproof baking tray or large casserole dish over a hob; add the swede and coat with oil. Carefully drizzle over 3 tablespoons maple syrup and toss well. Be careful not to catch and burn the syrup. Bake in the oven turning at intervals for 45 mins until crisp and golden.

swedes

butter-browned braised swede

This way of cooking swede is simple but really good. For vegetarians it’s ideal with a nut roast, or serve with roast chicken, pork, gammon or ham slices.

½ a medium swede, peeled, halved lengthways and then into 1½cm thick slices
a knob of butter, approx 25g
500ml veg or chicken stock

Melt the butter in a pan that will fit the swede in one layer (a medium sized, fairly deep frying pan is ideal). Cook the swede on a medium to high heat for a few mins on each side, without stirring, until golden brown. Add the stock, bring to the boil and let the swede bubble away for 20-25 mins, until it is tender and the liquid reduced to a syrupy glaze. Season with salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper.

Visit the recipe pages on our website for further recipes, or add organic swede to your order.

For more ideas for a Christmas rich in veg, download our seasonal booklet full of recipes and tips from our Riverford cooks and you, our customers. Available to download here: www.riverford.co.uk/christmas-veg.

12 veg of Christmas – 5 of the best potato recipes

Guy says
potatoesModern farming methods have not been kind to the humble potato. Intensively cultivated for high yield and fast growth, it’s been bred into staggering blandness, with generic offerings of ‘red’ and ‘white’ potatoes. We grow our potatoes slowly, choose our varieties judiciously and encourage you to savour their flavour and not consign them to use as a bulking item on your plate.

roast potatoes with lemon, rosemary and thyme

serves 6 as a side
Crisp and caramelised from roasting, tart and tangy from the lemons, this variation on traditional roast potatoes makes a particularly good side for chicken or fish, accompanied by a bitter leaf salad.

roast-potatoes-lemon-rosemary1.5kg fairly waxy potatoes (such as Marfona, Orla or Triplo), washed but not peeled, cut into halves or quarters, depending on size
2 lemons, cut into thick slices, plus an extra ½ lemon to finish
7–8 garlic cloves, unpeeled, lightly smashed
4 rosemary sprigs
6 thyme sprigs
4 tbsp olive oil
salt and black pepper

Heat the oven to 180°C/Gas 4. Put the potatoes into a pan of cold salted water, bring to a boil, then simmer for 10 minutes. Drain and let dry in a colander for a few minutes. Transfer to a roasting pan and scatter over the lemon slices, garlic, rosemary and thyme. Drizzle over the oil and toss together with your hands, making sure each potato is coated in oil. Season well with salt and pepper. Roast for 35–40 minutes, turning everything once or twice, until the lemons are starting to caramelise and the potatoes are golden brown. Squeeze over the extra lemon half, sprinkle with a little more salt and serve immediately.

Variations
* Small waxy potatoes such as pink fir apples and Charlottes can be halved lengthways, tossed with oil and salt and roasted from raw at 180°C/Gas 4.
* Toss the potatoes with a tablespoon of wholegrain mustard before roasting for more of a zing.

gratin dauphinoise

serves 6 as a side
Creamy or crusty? Waxy or floury potatoes? Everyone has their personal preference and there is certainly more than one way to make gratin dauphinois. The question of how to cook an authentic version was apparently so aggressively contested that Charles de Gaulle held a competition to determine the definitive recipe. Riverford Cook Anna learned this method from a Parisian chef, who assured her it was the real deal!

gratin-dauphinois50g butter
700ml whole milk
2 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
1 tsp fine salt
1 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp grated nutmeg
1kg medium all-rounder potatoes, peeled and cut lengthways into 4–5mm thick slices
200ml double cream

Heat the oven to 180°C/Gas 4 and grease a gratin or shallow ovenproof dish (about 15 x 20cm) with half the butter. Put the milk, garlic, salt, pepper and nutmeg in a large pan and slowly bring to the boil. Add the potatoes, return to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until half cooked. Using a slotted spoon, lift the potatoes from the milk into the dish. Discard the milk (or save it for another purpose). Shake the dish to distribute the potatoes evenly. Pour the cream over the potatoes and dot with the remaining butter. Bake uncovered for about an hour, until the potatoes are tender and a golden crust has formed. To make it easier to cut, let the gratin cool slightly before serving.

Variation
For something slightly less rich, layer the potatoes with 1 very finely sliced onion or leek and a few thyme leaves in a well-buttered gratin dish, seasoning each layer. Pour over 300ml chicken or veg stock (or a mix of half milk and half stock), dot with a little butter and bake for about 1 hour, or until the potatoes are cooked through. The top should be a little crispy, but if it is getting too brown before the potatoes are cooked, cover it loosely with foil.

rosemary & sherry baked chicken with saffron potatoes

serves 4

rosemary-sherry-baked-chicken-potatoes4 tbsp olive oil
8 chicken pieces – use a mix of thighs & drumsticks
knob of butter
900g potatoes, peeled & thickly sliced (1-2cm)
small pinch of saffron threads
½ tsp smoked sweet paprika
6 sprigs rosemary
4 bay leaves, roughly torn
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
200ml medium-dry sherry
sea salt & ground black pepper
small handful toasted flaked almonds (optional)

Heat the oil in a large shallow heat and flameproof casserole (or use a frying pan and transfer to a baking dish). Add the chicken and brown on all sides. Remove to a plate. Melt the butter in the same pan. Add the potatoes, saffron, paprika, rosemary, bay and garlic. Toss together. Lie the chicken pieces on top of the potatoes and pour over the sherry. Season. Bring to the boil, then transfer to the oven. Bake at 180°C for 45 mins, until the chicken is cooked and the potatoes are tender. Sprinkle over the almonds if using.

celeriac & potato mash

celeriac
potatoes
milk
butter

Cook as you would mashed potato but add one 1/3 to 2/3 as much celeriac as potato. The celeriac cooks faster and so should be added once the potatoes have come to the boil. Great with sausages and savoy cabbage or cavalo nero.

parsnip & potato cakes

350g potatoes, peeled & diced
700g parsnips, peeled & diced
oil for frying
1 large onion, peeled & finely chopped
1 garlic clove, peeled & crushed or finely chopped
knob of butter, about 20g
4 tbsp milk
a good grating of fresh nutmeg
1 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
1-2 eggs, beaten
120g fresh breadcrumbs

In a pan of salted boiling water, cook the potatoes, then the parsnips, until just tender (the potatoes will take about 10 mins, parsnips about 7). Drain. While the potatoes are cooking, heat a couple of tablespoons of oil in a large pan, add the onion and fry for a few mins until soft. Add the garlic and fry for another couple of mins. Put the potatoes, parsnips, butter, milk and nutmeg in a large bowl and season, then mash together before stirring in the onion and parsley. Set aside until cool. Put the eggs and breadcrumbs in separate shallow bowls. Take about 1 tablespoon of the potato/parsnip mix and use your hands to press it into a pattie shape. Dip it in the egg and then the breadcrumbs to coat and repeat until all the mixture is used. Add a little oil to a non-stick frying pan and fry the cakes, in batches, until golden on both sides. Drain on kitchen paper and keep warm in a low oven until you are ready to serve.

Visit the recipe pages on our website for further recipes, or add organic potatoes to your order.

For more ideas for a Christmas rich in veg, download our seasonal booklet full of recipes and tips from our Riverford cooks and you, our customers. Available to download here: www.riverford.co.uk/christmas-veg.

12 veg of Christmas – parsnip and roast parsnip recipes

Guy says
Before the arrival of cane sugar in Europe, parsnips were used as a sweetener for jams and cakes. Once sugar was introduced along with potatoes, some countries were pretty quick to relegate them to the category of cattle fodder. But the Brits kept them on as a significant commercial crop, and they are still one of the joys of winter: sweet, cheap and easy to cook. Parsnips are also slow to grow, which is good because their best flavour comes once we’ve had a few hard frosts – these unquestionably improve their sweetness, as part of the starch converts to sugar.

parsnipsParsnips have soft, porous skins and lose moisture faster than most other root veg. It’s best to leave the mud on as a protective coat. Store them somewhere cool and dark, or in a paper bag in the bottom of the fridge, and they’ll keep for a good 2–3 weeks. Usually you can use the whole vegetable, though late in the season (late February) the core might start getting a little tough, in which case quarter the parsnip lengthways and cut it out.

parsnip skordalia

serves 4-6 as a side or dip
Skordalia is a Greek side dish of potatoes and garlic whipped into a dip, thickened with stale bread or nuts and spiked with lemon. This parsnip version is good warm with lamb or mushrooms, or at room temperature as a dip for pitta bread. Parsnips are less likely to go gluey than potatoes when blended. The pungency of raw garlic is all part of the appeal in the original dish, but we recommend you add it a little at a time and taste.

parsnip=skordalia1kg parsnips, peeled and chopped into even sized chunks
1 bay leaf
400ml milk
60g fresh breadcrumbs
80g flaked almonds, lightly toasted
3–4 garlic cloves, crushed
80ml good olive oil
juice of 1 lemon
salt

Put the parsnips into a pan with the bay leaf and cover with the milk. Bring gently to the boil and simmer for 15–20 minutes, until very soft. Strain the parsnips, reserving the milk. Put the parsnips into a food processor with a dash of the milk and blend until smooth. Add the breadcrumbs, almonds and half the garlic and blend while adding the olive oil in a steady stream. Add half the lemon juice and a good pinch of salt. Check the seasoning and add more garlic, lemon juice and salt as you wish. If the mix is stiffer than you want, add a little more of the warm milk to loosen it.

Variations
* This dish can be warmed up with a little bit of spice. A clove or two added to the milk when you cook the parsnips works well (remove before you blend), as does a teaspoon of freshly ground cumin.
* If the punch of raw garlic is too much for you, take the edge off by adding the peeled garlic cloves to the milk and simmering them with the parsnips.
* Replace the almonds with toasted and skinned hazelnuts.

roasted parsnips with date & tamarind dressing

serves 4, prep 5 mins, cook 1 hour

parsnip-date-tamarind1 tbsp tamarind paste
½ tsp fennel seeds
½ tsp coriander seeds
50g pitted dates, finely chopped
1 red chilli, deseeded & finely chopped
½ tsp freshly grated ginger
500g parsnips, peeled & cut in half if small or chunks if larger
oil
1 lime

Put the parsnips in a baking dish and toss in just enough oil to coat. Season well. Roast at 190˚C for 45 mins-1 hour, until tender and browned (caramelised bits are a good thing with parsnips). Put the tamarind paste in a small heatproof bowl. Pour over 2 tbsp boiling water and leave for 15 mins. Meanwhile, put the fennel and coriander seeds in a small dry pan. Heat gently for a min or two, until you can just smell them, then grind in a pestle and mortar. Sieve the tamarind mixture and put the drained liquid in a small saucepan. Add the ground seeds, dates, chilli, ginger and 250ml water. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and bubble for 10 mins. Blitz in a blender until smooth. Squeeze some lime juice over the parsnips, then drizzle with the dressing. You can keep any leftover dressing in the fridge or freeze it.

parsnip, Brussels sprout and bacon potato cakes

serves 4
This is a jazzed-up version of bubble and squeak and can be adapted to finish up all sorts of leftover vegetables, though parsnips, sprouts and bacon is a particularly satisfying combination. A poached or fried egg or sausages would be a good addition.

parsnip-sprout-bacon-potato-cakes200g parsnips, peeled and cut into even-sized pieces (alternatively, you could use leftover boiled, steamed or roasted parsnips)
3 tbsp olive oil
300–400g potatoes, peeled and cut into even-sized pieces
200g Brussels sprouts, outer leaves removed
8 rashers smoked streaky bacon, finely sliced
polenta flour (or use ordinary plain flour), for dusting
salt and black pepper

Heat the oven to 200°C/Gas 6. Toss the parsnips with salt, pepper and about a tablespoon of the oil. Spread over an oven tray and roast for about 40 minutes, until soft and beginning to caramelise. Remove, allow to cool then roughly chop. While the parsnips are roasting, boil the potatoes in salted water until soft, about 20 minutes. Drain well and mash while warm. Keep your mash as dry as possible so that the cakes hold together; if it seems wet stir it over a low heat for a few minutes.
Cook the sprouts in plenty of salted boiling water until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain well and cut into quarters. Fry the bacon over a medium–high heat with a drizzle of oil in a large frying pan (preferably non-stick) until really crispy. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper. Keep the oil left in the pan to fry the cakes. Mix all the veg with the bacon and season with salt and pepper. Dust your hands with flour then mould the mixture into burgersized patties. Add the remaining oil to the frying pan, place over a medium heat and fry the cakes in batches until they are golden brown, about 5 minutes per side. Add more oil to the pan if you need it. If the first cakes have cooled down by the time you have fried the last, you can reheat them all in the oven for 5–10 minutes, until piping hot.

Variations
* Replace the parsnips with roasted beetroot or squash for striking coloured alternatives.
* Use raw grated apples instead of bacon for a vegetarian option.
* Experiment with your greens: try cabbage or kale.

parsnip & beer mustard gratin

serves 4, prep 10 mins, cook 1 hour 15 mins
Good on its own, or serve with greens and crusty bread for a vegetarian supper. It works well as a side for pork too.

parsnip-beer-mustard-gratinbutter for greasing
300ml milk
250ml cream
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves
800g parsnips, peeled & sliced into thin rounds
2 tbsp Riverford beer mustard
a little freshly grated nutmeg
small handful dried breadcrumbs
small handful freshly grated parmesan (or cheddar if vegetarian)

Preheat your oven to 180˚C/160˚C fan/gas 4. Lightly grease a medium sized gratin/baking dish with a little butter. Put the milk, cream, garlic and thyme leaves in a pan. Grate in a little fresh nutmeg, then warm gently. Layer the parsnips in the baking dish. Stir the mustard into the warm milk mixture. Season with salt and pepper, then pour over the parsnips. Cover tightly with foil and bake for 1 hour. Uncover, sprinkle over the cheese and breadcrumbs, then bake for approx 15 mins until golden.

parsnip, coconut, lime & ginger cake

serves 12, prep 15 mins, cook 35 mins

parsnip-coconut-cake2 large eggs
100g soft light brown sugar
75ml sunflower oil, plus a little extra for greasing the tin
200g parsnips (grated weight), approx 4 small or 2 large
100g self-raising flour
3 balls stem ginger, finely chopped
1 good tsp ground ginger
50g dessicated coconut
75g pecan nuts, roughly chopped
zest from 1 lime

Grease an 18cm round cake tin with a little oil on a piece of kitchen paper. Line it with baking parchment. Put the eggs and sugar in a large bowl and beat until thick and creamy (a hand held mixer really helps). Gradually whisk in the oil. Fold in the rest of the ingredients. Transfer the mixture to the tin and level it gently with your wooden spoon. Bake at 190˚C for 30-35 mins, until cooked through. Remove from the oven and leave to cool in the tin.

Visit the recipe pages on our website for further recipes, or add organic parsnips to your order.

For more ideas for a Christmas rich in veg, download our seasonal booklet full of recipes and tips from our Riverford cooks and you, our customers. Available to download here: www.riverford.co.uk/christmas-veg.

12 veg of Christmas – 5 cauliflower recipes

Guy says
After years in the culinary doldrums, condemned by sulphurous memories of sccauliflower-4hool dinners, cauliflower is back; and quite rightly so. Treated kindly, this sturdy brassica is fit for a feast and is much prized in Italy, Asia and Africa – in fact most places apart from where it grows best: in the UK. Cauliflowers love our damp, mild maritime climate, particularly in the mild West. Here are a few options for making the most of it over Christmas.

5 of the best cauliflower recipes:

cauliflower, butterbeans & kale

Serves 2
A robust winter salad, this is best served warm or at room temperature so that the flavours from the dressing have a chance to infuse. For a heartier meal, eat with slices of cold roast beef or topped with a sizzling pork chop.

cauliflower-butter-beans-and-kale200g cooked butter beans
1 cauliflower, cut into small florets
100g red Russian kale, blanched, squeezed and roughly chopped
1 tbsp capers, rinsed and drained
leaves from a small bunch of tarragon or flat-leaf
parsley, roughly chopped
wholegrain mustard, to taste
vinaigrette, to taste
salt and black pepper

If you are cooking the beans yourself, add a good pinch of salt when they have become tender and let them sit in their cooking water for 30 minutes off the heat. If using tinned, heat them gently but thoroughly in their liquid and a dash of water. Lightly steam or boil the cauliflower. Drain the beans and put them into a bowl with the cauliflower, kale, capers, herbs, a generous blob of mustard and a good drizzle of vinaigrette and toss to combine. Taste and adjust seasoning if needed.

Variation
This is a great way to use up leftover or tinned pulses; lentils and flageolet and haricot beans will all work well – or for a more varied texture try a combination of all three.

roasted cauliflower with butter, lemon and cumin

serves 4 as a side
The cumin gives this dish an Indian feel but the spicing is so subtle that it works in the most traditional of meals. The flavour combination suits roasted parsnips too.

roasted-cauliflower-with-butter-and-lemon1 cauliflower, split into florets
zest and juice of 1 lemon, plus the juice of another
80g butter, diced
2 rounded tsp cumin seeds, toasted and ground (or 2 tsp ready-ground cumin)
handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves, roughly chopped
salt and black pepper

Heat the oven to 190°C/Gas 5. Season the cauliflower with salt and pepper and spread it out in a roasting tin. Roast in the oven for 12–15 minutes until lightly golden. Cover with foil if it’s browning too much. Finish with a squeeze of lemon juice. Stir in the butter, cumin and lemon zest and roast for a further 3–5 minutes, until tender but so it still has bite. Remove the tin from the oven and stir in the parsley, then add the remaining lemon juice a little at a time to taste.

Variations
• For extra spiciness add 1 teaspoon of ground coriander and nigella (black onion) seeds with the cumin.
• Replace the cumin with dried or fresh thyme leaves.
• Swap the cumin for chopped garlic and chilli flakes (or chopped fresh chilli) and the parsley for fresh coriander leaves.

whole roasted cauliflower with almonds & garlic

serves 4

whole-roasted-cauliflower1 cauliflower
olive oil for roasting
sea salt & ground black pepper
50g flaked almonds
4 tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 tsp smoked sweet paprika
1 tbsp dry sherry
3 tbsp parsley, roughly chopped

Cut off any green leaves from the cauliflower and trim the core so it sits flat in a baking dish. Drizzle over just enough oil to cover the top of the cauliflower. Sprinkle over a little sea salt. Roast at 200°C until the top is golden brown and the cauliflower is just tender, about 1 hour. Keep it warm in the oven. Put the almonds in a frying pan and heat gently until toasted. Add the oil and garlic and fry for a min or two. Add the paprika and dry sherry and cook to reduce the liquid slightly. Stir in the parsley and season with salt and pepper. Present the cauliflower whole at the table, then cut into thin slices and drizzle over the almonds to serve.

saffron poached chicken with cauliflower couscous, dates & pine nuts

serves 4, prep 15 mins, cook 20 mins

saffron-poached-chick-and-cauliflower½ tsp saffron threads
2 carrots, roughly chopped
1 stick celery, roughly chopped
2 bay leaves
4 chicken breasts, skin removed

for the couscous:
1 small cauliflower, outer leaves removed, cut into florets
1 garlic clove, crushed
large handful finely chopped parsley
small handful finely chopped mint
100g pine nuts, toasted in a dry frying pan until golden
200g dates, pitted & chopped
1 tbsp sherry or good white wine vinegar
juice of 1 lemon
2 tbsp good olive oil
1 tbsp honey
100g mixed winter salad leaves

Put the saffron, carrot, celery and bay leaves in a saucepan. Add 1½ litres water, bring to a simmer and add the chicken (make sure it is completely covered with water). Simmer for approx 30 mins, until cooked. Leave to cool in the pan, then take the chicken out and tear or chop into pieces. Pulse the cauli in a food processor until it looks like couscous (or chop very finely if you don’t have a processor). Transfer to a large bowl. Mix in the garlic, herbs, pine nuts and dates. Season with salt and pepper. Whisk together the vinegar, lemon, oil and honey and mix into the cauliflower. Toss in the chicken. Taste and adjust the seasoning, lemon and oil if needed. Serve with the salad leaves.

gluten-free cauliflower & almond gratin

serves 4 as a main course, 6 or more as a side dish, prep 10 mins, cook 45 mins
Keep the lighter green leaves on your cauliflower for colour and flavour. Serve with rice or quinoa and cooked kale or cabbage, or roasted roots. Using a whisk to make any béchamel or cheese sauce is easier and gets a smoother result than stirring with a spoon.

caulifloer-and-almond-gratin1 large cauli, cut in ½ then each ½ into 6-8 large wedges, keeping the stalk & any lighter inner leaves intact
50g butter
50g rice flour (or use another starchy gluten-free flour, eg. potato)
500ml unsweetened almond milk
100g grated cheddar cheese, plus a little extra for sprinkling
1 heaped tsp dijon mustard (check it doesn’t have any gluten, some do)
2 small handfuls flaked almonds

Preheat your oven to 220˚C/200˚C fan/gas mark 6. Steam or boil the cauliflower and leaves for 4 mins. Drain and put to one side, so any excess moisture evaporates off. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a pan. Add the flour and stir on a very low heat for 2 mins. Remove from the heat, add 3-4 tbsp of the almond milk and whisk together to make a thick smooth paste. Gradually add the rest of the milk, whisking all the time, until the sauce is smooth. Return to the heat, add the cheese and gently heat for a few mins, until the cheese has melted and the sauce thickened. Stir in the mustard and season to taste. Put the cauli in a baking dish. Pour over the sauce and sprinkle over a little extra cheese. Bake for 15 mins. Sprinkle over the almonds and bake for a further 10-15 mins or so, until the almonds are golden.

Visit the recipe pages on our website for further recipes, or add organic cauliflower to your order.

For more ideas for a Christmas rich in veg, download our seasonal booklet full of recipes and tips from our Riverford cooks and you, our customers. Available to download here: www.riverford.co.uk/christmas-veg.